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Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

This month’s job openings at SHN Consulting Engineers & Geologists, Inc.:

  • Consulting Biologist (CEQA Expert) (Eureka)
  • Materials Testing Laboratory Manager (Willits)
  • Mid-level Civil Engineer, California PE (Willits)
  • Senior-level Civil Engineer, California PE (Redding)
  • Temporary Field Botanist/Wildlife Biologist (Eureka)

Good positions, good benefits, fun company to work for, great co-workers, wonderful area to live in.

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This month’s job openings at SHN Consulting Engineers & Geologists, Inc.:

  • Consulting Biologist (Eureka)
  • Materials Testing Laboratory Manager (Willits)
  • Mid-level Civil Engineer, California PE (Willits)
  • Senior-level Civil Engineer, California PE (Redding)
  • Temporary Field Botanist (Eureka)

If you or someone you know is interested in applying on one of SHN’s open positions, or wants additional information, please visit www.shn-engr.com or speak with Taylor Marie Baker, HR Manager.

Help us continue to provide quality-driven services to northern California and southern Oregon!

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This month’s job openings at SHN Consulting Engineers & Geologists, Inc.:

Willits office:

  • Materials Testing Laboratory Manager
  • Mid-Level Civil Engineer, P.E. (California)

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This month’s job openings at SHN Consulting Engineers & Geologists, Inc.:

Coos Bay office:

  • Design Drafter/Civil Engineer Technician (new)

Eureka office:

  • CEQA/NEPA Project Manager
  • Surveyor, L.S.I.T. or Surveyor, P.L.S. (California)

Willits office:

  • Materials Testing Laboratory Manager

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This month’s job openings at SHN Consulting Engineers & Geologists, Inc., updated:

Coos Bay office:

  • Design Drafter/Civil Engineer Technician (new)

Eureka office:

  • CEQA/NEPA Project Manager
  • Surveyor, L.S.I.T. or Surveyor, P.L.S. (California)

Willits office:

  • Materials Testing Laboratory Manager

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This month’s job openings at SHN Consulting Engineers & Geologists, Inc.:

Eureka office:

  • CEQA/NEPA Project Manager
  • Surveyor, L.S.I.T. or Surveyor, P.L.S. (California)

Willits office:

  • Materials Testing Laboratory Manager

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Trash canSometimes people are just so strange. In case anyone blinked and missed it, we’re in the middle of a recession, an economic downturn, whatever you want to call it. A lot of people are out looking for a job (or two) as we hit higher unemployment rates than we’ve seen in decades. And yet, people who should know better still send crappy résumés and provide dumb answers in writing to the most obvious questions.

I can’t really give specifics, but I’ve just encountered stunning examples of job seekers shooting themselves in the foot. I’m not talking about just a little dull or lacking pizazz; I’m talking abysmal errors that are sure to make any reader flee. So let me quickly dispell a few notions about résumés:

  1. A résumé is not a 10-page list of projects. Unless you’re applying for a very specific type of job, such as faculty in a higher learning institution, keep it to a page or two. If it’s appropriate for your type of work, you can always submit a list of projects as a separate support document, keeping the descriptions short, sweet, and punchy. You can also add all sorts of detail on your Website. But your résumé? No, keep it brief.
  2. A résumé is not a list of previous jobs held. It’s a short space in which to drive home the point about why an employer would want you, and not somebody else, to work for them. Tell people about problems you solved, things you improved.
  3. Spell-checking is not optional.. And that includes correctly spelling the names of the person and the company you are applying to. If you can’t spell, do find someone who can.
  4. Visual appeal is not just the cherry on top — it’s the framework for your résumé. It must be easy to read and to recognize when left with a pile of other résumés, yet tasteful and professional. Stick to white or off-white paper of good quality but without ostentation; use crisp fonts that are easy to read, contrasting pleasantly to help direct the eye. Go read The Non-Designer’s Design Book, by Robin Williams; it’s inexpensive, easy to read, and tremendously useful. Hand-written résumés are right out. Seriously, people.
  5. Petulance is not endearing. No matter how justified you think you are about blow-outs with past employers, please don’t trumpet them proudly in your résumé, nor in your cover letter, your interview, your e-mails, etc. Particularly if you’re now applying to the same employer, for the same boss.

Consider hiring a professional to help you with your résumé. For $100 to $200 you should be able to get something good. No, the pro can’t write it all for you; for things pertaining to your own area of expertise, you know more than the résumé writer. But do listen to him or her on their own area of expertise!

Bottom line: we all need a bit of help in a job search, because looking for work is not our job! But there is no excuse for sabotaging one’s own job-seeking effort with a wretched first contact.

Links of interest:

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